Articles tagged as ‘Design Process’

What Makes Someone Leave Your Website?

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Part of having a successful website is attracting visitors. Keeping those visitors on your site, however, is another topic altogether. Of course, once you have the visitor on your site you’ll want to keep them around for a while rather than seeing them quickly leaving to go somewhere else.

In order to do a good job of retaining visitors, increasing pageviews and time on the site, it’s important to think about what could cause visitors to leave. By knowing some of the major reasons that people are leaving your site, you can make adjustments to improve this situation.

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10 Steps to a Successful Design Project

Building a complete and effective website truly is a process. In this post we’ll take a brief look at the various steps that lead to a successful project. Of course, this will vary from case-to-case, but this is a pretty standard order of events.

1. Needs Analysis

I believe that it’s important to have a good idea of what you want or need from your website before you really get into the process. Some business owners that decide to have a website built or redesigned simply don’t consider exactly why they are doing it, and what they need to get out of the final product. This is a critical first step, because without knowing exactly where you want the project to go, it will come up short in one way or another.

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5 Steps to Improved Client Feedback

If you’ve done much design or development work for clients you know that getting effective feedback from the client is critical to the success of the project. Unfortunately, this can sometimes be a challenge. Depending on the types of clients that you work with, you may find that some of them are difficult to communicate with, not because they don’t have opinions, but because they don’t understand very much about the process of building a website.

From my experience these clients can be a bit more difficult to work with, not because they are hard to please or unreasonable in their expectations, but simply because they don’t always understand how much of an impact they need to have on the process. They hire a designer to create the site and they just assume that the designer can do what is needed.

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Designers and Communication Skills: Why and How to Improve

Earlier this week I posted a group interview with several established and successful designers. One of the questions that was asked to each participant was “What do you feel are the most important skills for a designer to have/develop?” By far the most popular answer was “communication skills.” While this is not technically a design-related skill, I was really pleased to see those responses, because I feel the same way. Communication skills can make or break any design project that you’re working on, so I thought I would cover the topic in more detail.

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Tips for Part-Time Web Designers

ClockFreelance web design can be an ideal part-time business. Starting on a part-time basis allows you to gain valuable experience and ease your way into full-time status rather than taking the plunge and the risk that comes along with it. During a stint as a part-timer you can learn volumes about what it takes to be a successful freelancer and you’ll probably find some things that you want to do more of and some things that you want to do less.

15 Tips for Part-Time Designers to Improve on the Experience:

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Questions to Ask Yourself When a Design is Coming Up Short of Your Expectations

All designers struggle at times to get a design to achieve a look that they are thoroughly happy with. Many times we’ll have an idea that really seems like it will work, but when it’s executed in code or in PSD format it just doesn’t look complete. Sometimes it can be difficult to pinpoint a specific reason that the design isn’t quite right.

In this post we’ll take a look at some questions to ask yourself when a design is not living up to your expectations. These should put you on the right path to identifying and improving the trouble areas. These questions focus primarily on the design, not necessarily the effectiveness of the site overall, the usability, or the content.

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