Articles by ‘Roy K’

Guide to Tumblr for Web Designers

If you’re just getting started as a serious web designer, then most likely you’ve debated whether or not you need some kind of blog. It’s fair enough to just have a website, but these days people are looking for regularly updated news and information – even if they don’t read it – they want to know you are regularly interacting with your own website. However, diving into a serious blog this late in the blog-trend game can make you feel like you are trying to shout to the drummer on stage when you’re at the back of a packed concert house filled with screaming fans.

This is where Tumblr comes in. Tumbl. is far from new; it was launched in spring of 2007 and has almost 65 million blogs. So don’t think you won’t have any competition. But what makes Tumblr unique is how fully it embraces micro-blogging. No one will expect Top 10s, How-Tos, and other extensive articles that take a serious amount of time to write professionally. Instead, Tumblr is a place to share pictures, quotes, and if you feel like it, you can choose to occasionally write up something more full-length.

Getting Started with Tumblr

So how do you get started with Tumblr? It’s as easy as anything. Just head over to the Tumblr website and sign up. Tumblr will provide you with a URL that will be something like yourname.tumblr.com and you can pick a theme and start blogging the same day you click yes, I’m ready to tumbl (That’s not actually what the button says, but it could be!)

Next you can redirect your Tumblr account to your own personal URL by going to your domain registrar’s control panel and following the directions you will find there.
Tumblr also provides an array of custom theme designs for you to choose from – or you could find one elsewhere on the web and even pay for a premium design. But to be honest, Tumblr is all about having an easy way to blog, and Tumblr has some awesome themes ready to go for you. Once you choose a theme, Tumblr will let you customize it on the spot – just don’t forget to hit save when you’re done.

Guide to Tumblr for Web Designers

Read More »

How Freelancers Can Go on Vacation without Losing Clients

Switching from a conventional 9-5 job to freelancing in every kind of profession- from writing children’s book to web design, comes with all kinds of great new standards of life – and some real slaps in the face as well. For example, maybe you were shocked to discover that you no longer get paid for responding to emails, or sick days are a thing of the past, or just how much time and effort goes into finding new clients. With time, most freelancers who stick with their career change will learn to balance their time, charge their client’s enough to make their time worth it, and start produce better work faster. However, the one constant that is difficult for every freelancer is vacation time.

Once you’ve built up a list of good clients who regularly come to you for assignments, the last thing you want to do is lose one by spending time on the beach. In fact, many freelancers find it easier to just stay home and keep working, rarely going on vacations because 1) they enjoy their job and 2) it’s just too much effort to go on vacation. However, this can be detrimental to your psyche, and your spouses and family’s moods as well. So, start planning out how you will unleash operation vacation now, so that you can go enjoy a trip, get a reprieve from working, and still return home to a list full of happy clients ready to send work your way.

How Freelancers Can Go on Vacation without Losing Clients

Read More »